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Boosting Response, CTR & Conversion: Bryan Eisenberg’s Secret Formula

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Conversion  /  PPC

In continuing aimClear coverage of #SESCHI, aimClear stepped inside… the Room of Secrets… along with an audience of curious online marketers. We were welcomed by Lee Odden, SES Advisory Board & CEO, TopRank Online Marketing who thoughtfully introduced solo panelist Bryan Eisenberg, SES Advisory Board and NYTimes Bestselling Author, bryaneisenberg.com. The session, by name, promised to unlock The Secret Formula to Boost Response, and Bryan, an NY Times best selling author/Internet marketing pioneer delivered an interactive presentation to an engaged audience.

aimClear live-tweeted this session (via @aengleson) — read on for full coverage of the tip, tactics & takeaways Bryan shared.

Where The Holy Grail of PPC & the Conversion Trinity Meet
There were two overarching themes to the session: The Holy Grail of PPC and the Conversion Trinity.

  • The Holy Grail of PPC marketing is achieved when we as marketers align targeting with:
    • The best ad copy
    • A useful landing page
    • And great CTR
  • To reach the Holy Grail, we must be aware of the Conversion trinity:
    • Be relevant
    • Be valuable
    • Make the next action obvious

Bryan ran through various AdWords PPC examples, asking: “Is this relevant? Does it show value? Is there a call-to-action” on the ad copy as well as the corresponding landing page?  Employing examples in which companies used dynamic keyword insertion (with often odd results such as “Buy Used Diapers” from eBay & such…) helped demonstrate, among other things, that dynamic insertion does not = flawless automation.

A Look At Bryan’s Methodology
Searching for the phrase “vacuum cleaner” will likely return an ad from Oreck.com, which is bidding on that very phrase:

Answering The Important Stuff

  • So… is this ad relevant to the query?
    • Yes- in a way, it advertises what we were searching for.
  • Does it show value?
    • No. It totally lacks essential elements, such as price, savings, or… value.
  • Is there a call to action?
    • Kind of.  “Get a cleaner home” doesn’t quite count as a CTA because it isn’t the next step.

Now, let’s ask these same questions about the landing page:

  • Is this relevant?
    • Yes, it displays vacuum cleaners, prices, and reviews.
  • Does it show value?
    • Yes, the price is listed (and has been reduced) and also showcases free shipping.
  • Is there a call to action?
    • Yes, “Add to Cart” is clearly & prominently placed on the page.
Bryan demoed this methodology for a heaping handful of verticals, from windshield wipers to alloy wheels. Each time, he literally handed the microphone to audience members and asked them, “Is this relevant?” … “Does it show value?” and so on. He even queued up Google on an iPad & demoed the process for brands & products shouted out by attendees. It made for a fantastically engaging session.

(Entertaining side-note: during this demo at least 4-5 people/companies in the audience realized that despite their robust PPC campaigns, they aren’t currently advertising to iPads… because iPads are considered mobile devices… #facepalm).

Extra Tips on Brand Competitors
Bryan pointed out that when bidding on a competitor’s brand, best practice is to display a graphical comparison of your brand/company/product vs. the competition on your landing page.  In addition to offering customer insight, this tactic can help ensure that your keyword is relevant to the landing page.

Hat-tip to Bryan for the great takeaways in this session– stay tuned for more coverage of #SESCHI here in aimClear Blog, and follow the aimClear team’s live-tweets from @lindsaylorraine (Lindsay) & @beebow (Lauren) & @aengleson (me).
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2 Comments

  1. Audience Response Systems on November 3, 2011 at 9:30 am

    I had a privilege to attend this one and I have to say I am far from disappointed. Bryan Eisenberg made a strong impression on me!

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